Category Archives: Physics Education Research

Thoughts about the goals, methods, and results of research into the teaching, learning, and utilization of physics knowledge.

MI-U “models” for physics 2

So after yesterday’s workshop on MI-U (Modeling Instruction, University level), I’m brainstorming possible “models” at the heart of a typical calc-based Physics II course, which I just happen to be teaching this fall. Here’s what comes to mind for models … Continue reading

Posted in Learning & Teaching, Modeling Instruction, Physics Education Research | 3 Comments

Stephanie’s latest podcast

Over on the PER User’s Guide, the always-dynamic Stephanie Chasteen has posted a new podcast in her series Learning About Teaching Physics. This one’s entitled Preparing Students to Learn from Lecture: Creating a “Time for Telling”. The idea of a … Continue reading

Posted in Educational Research, Learning & Teaching, Pedagogy, Physics Education Research, problem/project-based learning | 1 Comment

playing a game

“Playing a game is the voluntary attempt to overcome unnecessary obstacles.” — Bernard Suits, quoted in Jane McGonigal’s Reality is Broken Is learning physics a game? Is doing physics a game? Does it depend on how obligated we feel to … Continue reading

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getting out of their way

A radical thought: We (educational researchers and instructors) spend great time and energy trying to optimally engineer our students’ learning environments and experiences — pacing, sequencing, balance of examples vs. tasks vs. information, cognitive load, collaborative designs, testing intervals, reward … Continue reading

Posted in Educational Research, Learning & Teaching, Physics Education Research | 4 Comments

clicker resources posted

At Stephanie Chasteen‘s urging, I’ve posted a collection of my various writings about using clickers effectively to my web site. Beware: Some are more polished than others, and some are a little frayed around the edges. I hope you find … Continue reading

Posted in classroom response systems, Educational Research, Learning & Teaching, Pedagogy, Physics Education Research | 5 Comments