Category Archives: problem/project-based learning

a crazy collision of a teaching idea

I love it when two different ideas collide in my head, even when I’m not entirely sure whether the result is a beautiful synthesis or an ugly wreck. first idea In a conference paper I wrote exploring what we could … Continue reading

Posted in Learning & Teaching, Pedagogy, problem/project-based learning | 12 Comments

Stephanie’s latest podcast

Over on the PER User’s Guide, the always-dynamic Stephanie Chasteen has posted a new podcast in her series Learning About Teaching Physics. This one’s entitled Preparing Students to Learn from Lecture: Creating a “Time for Telling”. The idea of a … Continue reading

Posted in Educational Research, Learning & Teaching, Pedagogy, Physics Education Research, problem/project-based learning | 1 Comment

learning from the game designers

Grant Wiggins nails what I want to figure out how to do in physics. See the second half of this post, beginning with the paragraph that starts “Demographics have nothing to do with designing backward…”: Granted, but (Mar 29)

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worth reading

Grant Wiggins: “Everything you know about curriculum may be wrong. Really.”

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things I want in a course design

Just thinking out loud here… I want a course design that communicates very clearly to students, in every aspect of its framing and detail, that learning is something they must willfully pursue, not something that just “happens” if they’re obedient … Continue reading

Posted in Learning & Teaching, Pedagogy, problem/project-based learning, standards-based grading | 11 Comments